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BREAKING: Liberal CA, OR, WA to end K-12 school mask mandates mid-March

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The most liberal of liberal states are relaxing Covid-19 mask mandates following the CDC’s updated guidance. California, Oregon and Washington state announced they will drop their mask mandates for K-12 public schools beginning March 12th.

In a joint statement released Monday, the governors announced “with declining case rates and hospitalizations across the west, California, Oregon and Washington are moving together to update their masking guidance.”

For all three states, the guidance also applies to most indoor settings in addition to schools. What was recently justification for Democrats to fire federal employees is now a moot point, long after thousands of nurses, teachers, law enforcement and military personnel have been fired.

Republicans, many of which eased requirements months ago, lament that the science has not changed, and Democrat leadership is far behind. New York City Mayor Eric Adams and New York Governor Kathy Hochul recently cancelled mask mandates for indoor settings and public schools.

Adams also dropped the vaccine passport requirement for recreational venues in New York City beginning early March. National Review writes the “inter-state movement to ease pandemic restrictions suggests a growing consensus that Covid-19 is becoming endemic, and that citizens must learn to live with it to avoid further disrupting economies, livelihoods, and children, who many parents claim have born the brunt of restrictions in the form of academic and social regression.”

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1 Comment

  1. Jaye

    February 28, 2022 at 11:01 pm

    Teachers unions finally panicked enough?

    Too many parents are yanking their kids out of California government schools or have left this teacher-union controlled crazy train. One thing for sure, it was not The Science (TM). It was the bottom line and drop in teacher union memberships.

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COVID-19

Watchdog: Pentagon likely rushed denials of COVID-19 vaccine Religious Exemption requests

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The Army only approved just 24 religious COVID-19 vaccine exemption requests out of a total 8,514 requests submitted by active duty soldiers, and  1,602 requests have been rejected while the rest remain pending.

Military.com obtained information showing the Pentagon rushed vaccine exemption denials:

Sean O’Donnell, the Pentagon’s inspector general, wrote in a June 2 memo to Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin obtained by Military.com calling attention to a “concerning” trend in which military brass rushed to reject vaccine-exemption petitions rather than giving each request due consideration.

“We found a trend of generalized assessments rather than the individualized assessment that is required by Federal law and DoD and Military Service policies,” he said. “Some of the appellate decisions included documentation that demonstrated a greater consideration of facts and circumstances involved in a request.”

In March, a Texas judge blocked the Navy from dismissing sailors with pending exemption requests and in August, a Florida federal judge ordered class action relief and granted an injunction barring the federal government from enforcing the vaccine mandate for the Marine Corps.

National Review writes, “For the last year, military has been struggling with a recruitment problem. As of July, with only three months left in the fiscal year, the Army had met only 40 percent of its recruitment goal and reduced its active-duty force by 12,000 troops.”

O’Donnell calculated that officials likely gave each appeal a cursory glance rather than a thorough examination, possibly opening the door to litigation from service members who had to resign after they failed to obtain exemptions. Across all the branches, there were about 50 denials per day in a 90-day period, he determined. Over a thousand Coast Guardsmen have already tried to launch a class-action lawsuit in response to their being refused religious exemptions, the publication noted.

“The volume and rate at which decisions were made to deny requests is concerning,” the memo read. “Assuming a 10-hour work day with no breaks or attention to other matters, the average review period was about 12 minutes for each package. Such a review period seems insufficient to process each request in an individualized manner and still perform the duties required of their position.”

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