Connect with us

Nation

Biggs Demands that AG Barr release findings of DOJ election fraud probe

Published

on

Andy Biggs

Arizona Republican Rep. Andy Biggs demanded Friday that Justice Department Attorney General William Barr release the current findings of “his election fraud investigation.”

Biggs, who spoke at a press conference outside on Capitol Hill, said on Twitter that it “is imperative that the American people receive clarity as to the allegations and claims that have been raised about the 2020 election.”

“This election took place almost exactly one-month ago,” said Biggs, who is the Chairman of the House Freedom Caucus. “And when this election was concluded at least on that November 3 day, and there began to be questions about the integrity of that election – there were a number of us that did call the Department of Justice to begin looking investigating and going through the claims that were arising and going forward throughout this country.”

He added that “as votes were bing counted post Election Day complaints continued and we urged the Attorney General to investigate, to make sure that we can rely on the integrity of the election. In a republic there is nothing more detrimental than to not be able to trust your institutions created by those who have the ultimate power.”

“We don’t have any power as members of Congress. It is the people of this country from which our authority is derived because they delegate it to us,” Biggs added.

Last week, Barr disclosed to The Associated Press that thus far his “we have not seen fraud on a scale that could have effected a different outcome in the election.”

President Donald Trump’s lawyers, Rudy Giuliani and Jenna Ellis, shot back at Barr in a statement saying, “with all due respect to the Attorney General, there hasn’t been a semblance of a Department of Justice investigation,” they said. “We have gathered ample evidence of illegal voting in at least six states, which they have not examined.”

Let’s see what the DOJ has investigated. So far, with the Russia investigation into the FBI’s malfeasance and now with the election fraud probe it appears to be all talk and no action.Maybe it’s just gaslighting because we haven’t seen anything yet.

I agree with Biggs it’s the American people who must demand that the Justice Department do its job and present us with the facts. After all, we pay their salaries.

You can follow Sara Carter on Parler @SaraCarterOfficial and on Twitter @SaraCarterDC

Continue Reading

Israel

Military was prepared to deploy to Gaza to rescue U.S. hostages

Published

on

Screen Shot 2021 05 14 at 8.23.34 AM

The Washington Post released an in-depth report on the intelligence support the United States has provided Israel during its war with Hamas. The assistance has not only helped to find and rescue hostages, but the Post writes it has “also raised concerns about the use of sensitive information.”

The United States provided some of the intelligence used to locate and eventually rescue four Israeli hostages last week, The Post has reported. The information, which included overhead imagery, appears to have been secondary to what Israel collected on its own ahead of the operation, which resulted in the deaths of more than 270 Palestinians, according to Gaza health officials, making it one of the deadliest single events in the eight-month-old war.

Sullivan, the White House national security adviser, stressed that U.S. forces did not participate in the mission to rescue the four hostages. “There were no U.S. forces, no U.S. boots on the ground involved in this operation. We did not participate militarily in this operation,” Sullivan told CNN’s “State of the Union” on Sunday. He noted that “we have generally provided support to the [Israel Defense Forces] so that we can try to get all of the hostages home, including the American hostages who are still being held.”

One critical piece of information from The Post involves a “canceled” U.S. mission to rescue eight Americans:

In October, JSOC forces in the region were prepared to deploy in Gaza to rescue U.S. citizens that Hamas was holding, said current and former U.S. officials familiar with planning for what would have been an exceptionally dangerous mission.

“If we managed to unilaterally get information that we could act on, and we thought we could actually get U.S. people out alive, we could act, but there was genuinely very little information specifically about U.S. hostages,” one official said.

However, the intelligence-sharing relationship between the United States and Israel is not without scrutiny and concern. The Post reports:

In interviews, Israeli officials said they were grateful for the U.S. assistance, which in some cases has given the Israelis unique capabilities they lacked before Hamas’s surprise cross-border attacks. But they also were defensive about their own spying prowess, insisting that the United States was, for the most part, not giving them anything they couldn’t obtain themselves. That position can be hard to square with the obvious failures of the Israeli intelligence apparatus to detect and respond to the warning signs of Hamas’s planning.

The U.S.-Israel partnership is, at times, tense. Some U.S. officials have been frustrated by Israel’s demand for more intelligence, which they said is insatiable and occasionally relies on flawed assumptions that the United States might be holding back some information.

In a briefing with reporters at the White House last month, national security adviser Jake Sullivan said Washington “has provided an intense range of assets and capabilities and expertise.” Responding to a May 11 Washington Post report, Sullivan said that the intelligence is “not tied or conditioned on anything else. It is not limited. We are not holding anything back. We are providing every asset, every tool, every capability,” Sullivan said.

Other officials, including lawmakers on Capitol Hill, worry that intelligence the United States provides could be making its way into the repositories of data that Israeli military forces use to conduct airstrikes or other military operations, and that Washington has no effective means of monitoring how Israel uses the U.S. information.

The Biden administration has forbidden Israel from using any U.S.-supplied intelligence to target regular Hamas fighters in military operations. The intelligence is only to be used for locating the hostages, eight of whom have U.S. citizenship, as well as the top leadership of Hamas — including Yehiya Sinwar, the alleged architect of the Oct. 7 attacks, and Mohammed Deif, the commander of Hamas’s military wing. The State Department in 2015 designated both men as terrorists. Three of the eight U.S. hostages have been confirmed dead, and their bodies are still being held in Gaza, according to Israeli officials.

Continue Reading

Trending