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Biden’s plan will worsen inflation, ‘disproportionately harm minority families and small businesses’

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Republicans on the House of Ways and Means Committee put out a press release detailing how “Biden tax hikes increase burdens for taxpayers” and how the Democrat policies “disproportionately harm minority families and small businesses.”

The United States is suffering a 40-year high inflation, and Biden’s budget includes further tax hikes on Americans and over one million small businesses. His plans reverse “the gains made under the Republican-led Tax cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA)” the release states.

The press release quotes President and CEO of the Job Creators Network, Alfredo Ortiz, who testified during a Ways and Means hearing in April. Ortiz wrote an op-ed for Breitbart News, in which he wrote:

“President Biden’s recently announced budget proposes raising taxes by $2.5 trillion. He plans to hike taxes by one-third on the approximately one million small businesses structured as corporations. He also wants to raise tax rates on successful Americans and small businesses structured as pass-throughs.”

“Small businesses depend on tax certainty to bring the economy and labor market back to pre-pandemic levels. Small businesses and ordinary Americans also need these tax savings to help blunt the impact of historic inflation caused by Democrats’ reckless spending that’s devalued the dollar. This week, the Bureau of Labor Statistics announced that consumer prices have risen by 8.5 percent and wholesale prices by 11.2 percent over the previous year. Eliminating the TCJA would compound the pain of this inflation tax.”

During Ortiz’s testimony, he warned that Democrats’ threat of crippling tax hikes, inflationary spending, and persistent worker shortage disproportionately harm minority families and small businesses. “President Biden’s proposed tax increases and labor regulations would disproportionately impact small businesses, reducing their ability to expand, hire, and raise wages for minority employees.”

“Prices right now are growing three times faster than paychecks. For an average family in America, it means you’ve lost ground by about $5,700 over the last year, which is why most Americans feel like they’re financially worse off now than they were during the height of the COVID pandemic. Not a good sign. We also got bad news from small businesses yesterday. Their optimism is at the lowest ever recorded. And for maybe the same reason – inflation is just hammering them and they can’t find workers.”

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Economy

No help at our border, but Biden announces $5 billion going to bike paths, wider sidewalks

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In the world of Democrat delusion, they think $5 billion is necessary, at this point in time, to make bike paths and widen side walks. You cannot make this up. They have approved $40 billion in aide to Ukraine in a heartbeat under President Biden, while having rejected former President Trump’s request for a mere $5 billion to secure our border.

The news also comes as fentanyl and the drug overdoses are the number one cause of death in the U.S. There’s also an increase in human smuggling and extortion to pay to cross the border. But no; let’s make some bike paths and widen sidewalks. That is an immediate emergency.

Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg announced Monday that money will be used over five years under his department’s new “Safe Streets & Roads for All” program. The $5 billion ini federals funds will be used “to slow down cars chia more speed cameras, carve out bike paths and wider sidewalks and urging commuters to public transit” reports Daily Mail.

“The aim will be to provide a direct infusion of federal cash to communities that pledge to promote safety for the multiple users of a roadway, particularly pedestrians and bicyclists.” The announcement also coincides with the six-month anniversary of President Biden’s infrastructure legislation, and the beginning of the 2022 “infrastructure week.”

The desire to fix roads is a noble one, as “road traffic injuries also are the leading cause of death among young people aged 5-29. Young adults aged 15-4 account for more than half of all road deaths” reports Daily Mail, which adds:

Still, much of the federal roadmap relies on cooperation from cities and states, and it could take months if not years to fully implement with discernible results – too late to soothe 2022 midterm voters unsettled by this and other pandemic-related ills, such as rising crime.

The latest U.S. guidance Monday invites cities and localities to sketch out safety plans in their applications for the federal grants, which are to be awarded late this year.

It cites examples of good projects as those that promise to transform a high-crash roadway, such as by adding rumble strips to slow cars or installing speed cameras, which the department says could provide more equitable enforcement than police traffic stops; flashing beacons for pedestrian crosswalks; new ‘safe routes’ via sidewalks or other protected pathways to school or public transit in underserved communities; and other ‘quick build’ roadway changes designed with community input.

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