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Biden’s Backwards Border Policies: Threatens to Sue Texas over new Deportation Law

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As continuation of the Biden administration’s backwards border policies it has threatened to sue the State of Texas. Just before the New Year Biden warned Texas Republican Governor Greg Abbott that legal action will be taken if the state enforces a new law that allows authorities to arrest, jail, prosecute and deport migrants who enter the country illegally.

The law, SB4 or Senate Bill 4, is part of Texas’ Operation Lone Star and goes into effect on March 5. A letter from a Justice Department official sent to Abbott claims the law is unconstitutional and “contrary to the US commitment of ensuring the processing of noncitizens consistent with the Immigration and Nationality Act.”

“SB 4 is preempted and violates the United States Constitution. Accordingly, the United States intends to file suit to enjoin the enforcement of SB 4 unless Texas agrees to refrain from enforcing the law,” Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Brian M. Boynton writes in the missive, obtained by CBS News.

SB 4, signed into law by Abbott on December 18, makes illegally entering the US from Mexico a state crime and authorizes police to arrest individuals suspected of crossing the Rio Grande between ports of entry. The New York Post reports that migrants caught illegally entering the country would face a Class B misdemeanor charge carrying a punishment of up to six months in jail. Repeat offenders would be subject to a second-degree felony charge punishable by up to 20 years in prison. SB 4 also allows Texas judges to drop charges against migrants if they agree to be deported.

The new law “intrudes into a field that is occupied by the federal government and is preempted,” Boynton argues.

“Indeed, the Supreme Court has confirmed that ‘the removal process’ must be ‘entrusted to the discretion of the Federal Government’ because a ‘decision on removability’ touches ‘on foreign relations and must be made with one voice.’”

 

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Nation

Canadian-U.S. border illegal crossings up 240% over previous year

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The vulnerability of the northern border of the United States is being weaponized in the war on illegal migration. 2023 saw a 240% increase of individuals apprehended from just one year prior. Not only is the border with Canada significantly longer than its border with Mexico, but its ports of entry are often understaffed while the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is forced to prioritize the southern surge.

According to recent data from U.S. Customs and Border Protection, in 2023 authorities halted over 12,000 migrants attempting illegal crossings at the Canadian border. The number is a 240% increase from the preceding year when 3,579 individuals were apprehended.

ADN America reports that approximately 70% of the illegal crossings took place along a 295-mile stretch along the northern New York, Vermont, and New Hampshire border called the Swanton Sector.

Chief patrol agent for the sector, Robert Garcia, posted on social media that the 3,100 individuals apprehended were from 55 different countries. 

Garcia wrote “the record-breaking surge of illegal entries from Canada continues in Swanton Sector” and he specifically mentioned that the arrest of 10 Bangladeshi citizens was prompted by a citizen’s report in Champlain, New York.

Surprisingly, ADN reports:

A significant number of those engaging in illegal crossings are Mexicans who exploit the opportunity to fly to Canada without a visa, also avoiding the presence of cartels in their home countries.

Experts suggest that migrants can purchase a $350 one-way plane ticket from Mexico City or Cancun to Montreal or Toronto. This route is perceived as offering a lower likelihood of being turned away compared to those crossing the southern border.

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