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Biden Secretary of Education refuses to define ‘woman’ in Title IX hearing

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President Joe Biden’s Secretary of Education is stumped as to what a woman is. During a House Appropriations Committee hearing, Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona engaged in a “tense back-and-forth” with Georgia Republican Representative Andrew Clyde on Tuesday.

Cardona was defending proposed changes to Title IX rules “that would make it illegal for schools to ban transgender athletes from playing on sports teams consistent with their gender identity” reports the New York Post.

The New York Post reports:

The tentative Title IX rule change unveiled by the Biden administration earlier this month would forbid schools that receive federal funding from implementing a “one size fits all” policy for athletes, but does allow discretion to impose team eligibility rules that would restrict a transgender student’s participation in certain sports if it serves “important educational objectives” — such as competitive fairness and reduction of injury risk.

Schools that choose to impose limits must “minimize harms” to students who lose out on athletics opportunities, the proposal says.

Not only was Cardona unable to say how much the proposed rule would cost taxpayers, but he also failed to respond to the question, “Can you please tell me or can you please define for me what is a woman?” from Representative Clyde.

Cardona deflected the question, stating only that the Department of Education’s focus “is to provide equal access to students including students who are LGBTQ – access free from discrimination.”

Cylde continued with his line of questioning on gender, again asking “What’s the definition of a woman?”

“I think that’s almost secondary to the important role that I have as secretary of education,” Cardona said.

When asked again, Cardona answered that his job” is to make sure that all students have access to public education, which includes co-curricular activities.”

The Biden administration official also refused to go on record with his beliefs on whether “a biological male who self-identifies as a woman should be allowed to compete in women’s sports,” only responding that “all students” should have access to school sports.

“Preventing students from participating on a sports team consistent with their gender identity can stigmatize and isolate them,” the White House said after unveiling the proposed change to the 51-year-old Title IX rules. “This is different from the experience of a student who is not selected for a team based on their skills.”

“Through the Department of Education, President Biden, in my opinion, is attempting to weaponize Title IX, morphing it from a law that protects women to a law that disadvantages or endangers women. Further, the department is doing so with taxpayer dollars, an action that spotlights were your and your president’s true priorities lie in my opinion,” Clyde said.

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Report: Denver area migrants cost $340 million to shelter, educate

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A report by the free-market Common Sense Institute found the more than 42,000 migrants who have arrived in Denver over the last year and a half have cost the region as much as $340 million. The city of Denver, local school districts, and the region’s health-care system have spent between $216 million and $340 million combined to shelter, feed, clothe, and educate the migrants, and to provide them with emergency medical care.

National Review explains the report builds off a previous report from March that conservatively found that the migrants had cost the region at least $170 million. “Costs are never localized,” said DJ Summers, the institute’s research director. “They expand outward.”

Democratic leaders are being blamed for their welcoming posture toward immigrants generally, and their sanctuary-city policies, which curtail law enforcement’s ability to cooperate with federal immigration agents. Since late December 2022, at least 42,269 migrants — or “newcomers” as Denver leaders call them — have arrived in the city, adds National Review.

The Common Sense Institute report found that the migrant crisis has also hit local emergency rooms hard with extensive expenses. Since December 2022, migrants have made more than 16,000 visits to metro emergency departments. At an estimated cost of about $3,000 per visit, that has resulted in nearly $48 million in uncompensated care.

Summers said those costs are “stressing existing health care organizations,” but they also indirectly hit residents in their pocketbooks through increased insurance prices.

Metro school districts have endured the biggest financial hit — estimated between $98 million and $222 million — according to the Common Sense Institute report. The large range in costs is due to the difficulties researchers had identifying exactly how many new foreign students are tied to the migrant crisis.

The researchers found that since December 2022, 15,725 foreign students have enrolled in local schools. Of those, 6,929 have come from the five countries most closely identified with the migrant crisis — Venezuela, Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras.

On average, it costs a little over $14,000 to educate a student for a year in a Denver-area public school, but Summers said migrant students likely cost more.

“They have transportation needs that are different, they have acculturation needs that are going to be different, language assistance needs that are going to be different,” he said. “Many of them might need to get up to speed in curriculum. They might need outside tutoring.”

Earlier this year, Colorado lawmakers approved $24 million in state funding to help school districts statewide plug budget holes related to the migrant students.

Summers said the updated Common Sense Institute tally is likely still missing some costs related to the ongoing migrant crisis.

“There are definitely additional costs. We just don’t have a great way to measure them just yet,” he said, noting legal fees, crime, and unreported business and nonprofit expenses.

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