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Biden Admin uses Tom Hanks for ‘credibility’ in new video, just like ‘The Simpsons Movie’

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Joe Biden

The famous pop-culture cartoon “The Simpsons” is playing out in real life in American politics. In a 2007 episode, the Simpsons predicted “that government would become so inept they’d need to enlist the help of actor Tom Hanks to gain back credibility, and the Biden administration appears to be doing just that” writes the Daily Caller News Foundation.

President Biden has enlisted the actor, Tom Hanks, to narrate a video wholly focused on promoting his first year in office. Axios exclusively reported on the upcoming video which will be using average Americans telling stories of hope, all in the name of “commemorating” Biden’s first year.

We wonder if the Americans in the video will be hired actors, taking a page out of vice president Kamala Harris’ video talking to children about space. Harris released a bizarre video having a ‘fireside chat’ conversation with hired child actors.

The Biden-Harris Presidential Inaugural Committee reportedly said of the video, “In recognition of the President’s first year in office, the Biden-Harris Presidential Inaugural Committee believed it was important to celebrate the strength and perseverance of the American people in the face of extraordinary adversity, just as we did a year ago today.”

In the 2007 “The Simpsons Movie” actor Tom Hanks made an appearance in a government-sponsored TV ad for the Grand Canyon. The actor’s great line is: “Hello. I’m Tom Hanks. The US Government has lost its credibility, so it’s borrowing some of mine.”

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1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Keith Guise

    January 22, 2022 at 2:00 pm

    The fact that Tom Hanks is speaking for Biden precludes his credibility already. He should stick to being the fine actor that he is.

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National Security

Army’s First Trans Officer Indicted for Spying for Russia

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The U.S. Army’s first transgender officer and his wife, a Maryland doctor, are making headlines. No, not for breaking any ideological woke barriers; for “allegedly attempting to transfer confidential military medical information to Russia.”

The two were charged in an eight-count indictment on conspiracy charges Wednesday. Major Jamie Lee Henry, who lived with his anesthesiologist wife Anna Gabrielian, was granted his request to officially change his name in accordance with his gender preference in 2015.

Henry and Gabrielian allegedly volunteered to “retrieve private medical records from the United States Army and Johns Hopkins in order to assist the Russian government.”

National Review reports:

The pair are accused of stealing patient health files from Johns Hopkins and Fort Bragg and giving them to an individual they believed to be working for the Russian government. They aimed to show that they could access classified information and readily provide it to Moscow to demonstrate their allegiance, according to the indictment.

However, the individual to whom they hoped to deliver the information was an undercover FBI agent. At a covert August 17 meeting, Gabrielian told the agent that she was devoted to helping Russia’s cause even if it cost her her job or landed her in prison. She arranged a subsequent meeting with Henry and the agent, still believing him to be affiliated with the Kremlin.

That evening, in the agent’s hotel room, Henry expressed that he was committed to supporting Russia and had considered enlisting in the Russian army after the invasion of Ukraine. However, he told the agent he was disqualified because he didn’t have any “combat experience.”

“The way I am viewing what is going on in Ukraine now, is that the United States is using Ukrainians as a proxy for their own hatred toward Russia,” Henry reportedly told the agent.

“Prior to Henry’s case, identifying as a sex different than the one on one’s birth certificate made a soldier unfit for military service, warranting discharge” writes National Review.

Gabrielian worked at the Johns Hopkins school of medicine, and Henry worked as a staff internist stationed at Fort Bragg.

If convicted, the two could face up to five years in federal prison for the conspiracy charge, and a maximum of ten years in federal prison for each count of publishing secret military medical records.

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