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Attendee of Warnock’s camp alleges counselors threw urine on him, forced him to sleep outside

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A man who attended a summer camp run by Georgia Democratic Senate candidate Raphael Warnock, says counselors threw urine on him and forced him to sleep outside, the Washington Free Beacon has reported.

Anthony Washington, now 30, attended Camp Farthest Out in Carroll County, Maryland in 2002. Washington was 12-years-old at the time and had just moved to Maryland from California with his family. His mother sent him and his sister to the camp – a rural church-run camp for inner city children – to make friends.

According to the report, Warnock was a senior pastor at Douglas Memorial Community Church, which oversaw the camp.

Washington told the Free Beacon that after wetting his bed one night, he was forced to sleep outside on the basketball court without a pillow or blanket.

“I’m like, ‘hell no I’m not, it’s cold out there,’” Washington said in an interview with the Free Beacon. “[The counselors] wouldn’t let me in the house, not at all. … Shut the door to the cabin, locked it. It was dark. There wasn’t nothing out there but the basketball court. I ain’t never experienced nothing like that. Like, you’re not in a tent, you’re not in nothing. You’re just out, God knows where.”

Counselors also threw urine on him from a bucket they used when there wasn’t a bathroom nearby, he added.

Washington said he saw counselors “grab kids,” adding that he was worried for himself and his sister.

Campers were prohibited from calling their parents. When Washington was finally able to tell his mother about his experience at the camp, she went to court.

Washington said his family eventually received a financial settlement in the case.

“I went through that experience myself,” Washington said. “I don’t even like talking about this shit.”

By 2003, the state shut down the camp.

Warnock defended himself at the time, telling The Baltimore Sun in August of that year that he and the other reverend at the camp had acted “well within the framework of the law, and I am confident that we will be exonerated.”

“It’s just unfortunate that our children had to see their pastors carried away in handcuffs,” he continued. “My concern simply had to do with the presence of counsel. We cooperated fully with their investigation. We have nothing to hide.”

According to the 2002 police report, Warnock was “uncooperative and disruptive” when they arrested him for allegedly obstructing a child abuse investigation by Maryland State Police that centered on the camp’s treatment of children. Law enforcement officers had “never encountered” resistance like Warnock’s.

Kelly Loeffler, Warnock’s Republican opponent, called the allegations of abuse “disgusting” and “alarming.” She said Georgians have a right to know what Warnock’s involvement with the camp was, and how much he knew about the alleged abuse.

“Clearly something was going on here,” Loeffler said in an interview with the National Review. “This is the camp that he ran, that he oversaw, that he was involved in every single day, that was later shut down and he left the church.”

Warnock is currently running against Loeffler for the Georgia Senate position.

“I don’t think nobody like [Warnock] should be running for damn Senate nowhere, running a camp like that,” Washington said. “He should not be running for government.”

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Elections

New York City Dems Push Law to Allow 800,000 Non-Citizens to Vote in Municipal Elections

The New York City Council will vote on December 9 on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections

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New York’s Democratic party is battling over the constitutionality of voter laws. On December 9, the New York City Council will vote on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections.

“Around 808,000 New York City residents who have work permits or are lawful permanent residents would be eligible to vote under the legislation, which has the support of 34 of 51 council members, a veto-proof majority” reports Fox News.

“It’s important for the Democratic Party to look at New York City and see that when voting rights are being attacked, we are expanding voter participation,” Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez, a sponsor of the bill and Democrat who represents the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, told the New York Times. Rodriguez immigrated from the Dominican Republic and became a U.S. citizen in 2000.

Fox News reports:

Laura Wood, Chief Democracy Officer for the mayor’s office, said at a hearing on the bill in September that the law could violate the New York State Constitution, which states that voters must be U.S. citizens age 18 or older.

Mayor Bill de Blasio indicated he could veto the bill following the September hearing.
“We’ve done everything that we could possibly get our hands on to help immigrant New Yorkers—including undocumented folks—but…I don’t believe it is legal,” de Blasio told WNYC radio at the time.

Mayor-elect Eric Adams, however, submitted testimony to the September hearing in favor of the bill. “In a democracy, nothing is more fundamental than the right to vote and to say who represents you and your community in elected office…Currently, almost one million New Yorkers are denied this foundational right.”

The legislation was first introduced two years ago, but had not yet gained traction due to the legal concerns.

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