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Arlington To Fine Groups Of Three Or More On Sidewalks

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Officials in Arlington County, Virginia unanimously voted to enforce social distancing on sidewalks to minimize the spread of the COVID-19 virus, according to a press release.

“While most Arlingtonians are adhering to requirements to wear masks and maintain social distancing, unfortunately, some are not,” Arlington County Board Chair Libby Garvey said.

“They are putting themselves and our community at risk of serious illness or death during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Board hopes that this step will make it clear to our entire community that this pandemic is far from under control and that we are serious about maintaining social distance to slow its spread and save lives. We hope that through outreach and education, we will get voluntary compliance and will not have to issue a single ticket.”

According to Fox 5 DC, groups with more than three people, and those who fail to maintain a 6-foot distance from others could face a traffic fine of up to $100.

Arlington is currently in Phase 3 of reopening, meaning many restaurants and businesses have reopened. However, the “significant crowding inside restaurants and on the public sidewalks, rights of way, and adjacent public spaces where patrons gather for oftentimes prolonged periods awaiting admission into the restaurants,” the local leaders noted in their decision.

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Study finds harmful levels of ‘forever chemicals’ in popular bandage brands

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A new consumer study tested several brands of bandages and found higher levels of fluorine in bandages from Band-Aid, CVS Health, Walmart, Rite Aid, Target and Curad, which contain harmful levels of “forever chemicals,” also known as PFAS.

The study by Mamavation and Environmental Health News revealed that out of 40 bandages from 18 different brands, 26 contained organic fluorine, an indicator of PFAS.

“Because bandages are placed upon open wounds, it’s troubling to learn that they may be also exposing children and adults to PFAS,” said Dr. Linda S. Birnbaum, the study’s co-author and the former director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and National Toxicology Program.

News Nation reports that the study found the chemicals present in the adhesive part of the bandages. Mamavation said some brands likely used the PFAS in bandages “for their waterproof qualities.”

“It’s obvious from the data that PFAS are not needed for wound care, so it’s important that the industry remove their presence to protect the public from PFAS and opt instead for PFAS-free materials,” Birnbaum said.

According to the study, the chemicals are linked to several health effects, including “reduced immune system, vaccine response, developmental and learning problems for infants and children, certain cancers, lowered fertility, and endocrine disruption.”

While the exposure risk to PFAS through the skin isn’t clear, skin exposure “poses similar health risks” as eating or drinking food contaminated with PFAS, according to a previous study by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

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