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Arlington National Cemetery cancels ‘Wreaths Across America’ event due to COVID19

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Arlington 198074138 1

It feels like COVID-19 will never end.

My daughter, like many children across the United States, participate in “Wreaths Across America” where they work hard to raise money to lay wreaths on the graves of our most sacred warriors – those men and women who dedicated their lives in the service of the nation to protect our most sacred freedoms.

Now, those freedoms we hold so dear have become as fragile as the paper the Constitution was written on. The reaction to the COVID-19 pandemic and the random rules, lockdowns and selective (non-scientific) restrictions have encroached on our freedom and this wielding of power will be a tool governments will use to impose control over the people.

Give it time, you’ll see.

Arlington National Cemetery is outdoors and the ceremony is outdoors. The events can always be modified by the groups who will all be wearing masks.

But that is not enough for those imposing these restrictions. They are afraid that even if one person comes down with a light case of COVID-19 the left will target them and call them super-spreaders.

It’s a fear of being criticized by those charged with virtue signaling and it’s also a way to show support for those imposing restrictions across the nation- it’s a way of saying I’m one of you.

Those who are brave are buried beneath the earth of Arlington National Cemetery and their headstones are our reminders of what is worth fighting and dying for in our nation.

The COVID-19 pandemic should not allow our government to sidestep or pillage our American freedoms granted in the Constitution.

Read Arlington National Cemetery Press Release Below:

Due to the current COVID-19 situation across the nation and within the National Capital Region, it is with great regret that Arlington National Cemetery is canceling Wreaths Across America at Arlington National Cemetery and the Soldiers’ and Airmen’s Home Cemetery on December 19, 2020.

Following a thorough analysis of the annual Wreaths Across America Wreaths-In event this year, and in close collaboration with the Joint Task Force, National Capital Region, we determined that we could not implement sufficient controls to mitigate the risks associated with hosting an event of this size under current and forecasted infection and transmission rates, while still conducting a respectful and honorable public event.

“We did not make this decision lightly. Despite the controls developed to disperse potential crowds in time and space, and required personal safety protocols, we determined that hosting any event of this scale risked compromising our ability to accomplish our core mission of laying veterans and their eligible family members to rest,” stated Karen Durham-Aguilera, Executive Director, Office of Army National Cemeteries and Arlington National Cemetery. “We reviewed various options to safely execute this long standing event and held numerous consultations with WAA leadership and local government and public health officials. We understand that although this is disappointing for so many, we could no longer envision a way to safely accommodate the large number of visitors we typically host during this event.”

ANC’s most sacred mission to lay our nation’s veterans and their family members to rest continues during this COVID-19 environment. In order to ensure that our primary mission takes place, and to protect our workforce and visitors, the cemetery is taking this proactive step to adhere to the guidance outlined by the CDC to prevent contracting or spreading respiratory illnesses like the flu or COVID-19.

“Our strong hope is to be able to resume hosting this great event next year in 2021,” said Charles “Ray” Alexander, Superintendent, Arlington National Cemetery.  “While many of our families and visitors associate the wreath event with the holiday season, we thank all the thousands of volunteers who had planned to take this time to Honor, Remember, and Explore those who are laid to rest at our nation’s most hallowed ground. We invite everyone to virtually visit the cemetery through our multimedia platforms @ArlingtonNatl.”

Family pass holders and visitors are still welcome to visit the cemetery on their own schedules and place graveside tributes of privately purchased flowers or wreaths in accordance with our floral policyClick here for more information

If this notification impacts your participation in the Wreaths Across America event, please visit their website for updated information: https://wreathsacrossamerica.org.

Check this website and our social media platforms (@ArlingtonNatl) for the most updated visitor information and COVID-19 policies and procedures, or contact our call center at 877-907-8585.

You can follow Sara A. Carter on Parler @SaraCarterOfficial

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Remote Learning Lowered Test Scores in Every State; Minority Students Hit the Worst

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Remote Learning

A paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) shows remote learning has had a negative impact on students’ test scores in every state. Not only were students across the country affected, minority students were impacted the most.

According to the publication, remote learning led to declines in test scores for English and math, when compared to scores of students who went to schools with more in-person learning. “Our research shows that test score losses are significantly larger in districts with less in-person learning,” said Emily Oster, professor of economics at Brown University.

“This suggests, yes, that virtual learning was – and is – less effective than in-person learning, at least as measured by school-based testing” added Oster. “Passing rates in math declined by 14.2 percentage points on average; we estimate this decline was 10.1 percentage points smaller for districts fully in-person,” the study found.

The research combined “district-level schooling mode data from the 2020-21 school year,” “district-level test score data from 2015 to 2021” and “demographic data from the NCES,” according to the study.

Data was collected from students in third to eighth grades in 12 states: Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, Ohio, Rhode Island, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Score declines showed variations by state, as well. Virginia “which had the most complete virtual learning time, along with Colorado, saw an almost 32% drop on math test scores in the 2020-21 school year when compared to the 2018-19 school year” reports Tampa Free Press.

Wyoming, however, “which had the most in-person learning, along with Florida, saw just a 2.3% drop in English, the study found.”

“Changes in English Language Arts (ELA) were smaller than math scores overall, but drops in scores were greater in districts with larger black and Hispanic populations and students eligible for free and reduced lunch prices” reports Tampa Free Press.

“Districts that have a larger share of black and Hispanic students and less in-person schooling also saw a greater decline in ELA test scores than those with more in-person schooling. “

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