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AOC blames Dems for eviction moratorium, saying ‘we cannot in good faith blame the Republican Party’

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By Jenny Goldsberry

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) appeared on CNN’s State of the Union Sunday to talk about the eviction moratorium expiring. She put the blame on the Democrat party for letting the COVID-19 relief policy go by the wayside.

“The House and House leadership had the opportunity to vote to extend the moratorium, and there was frankly a handful of conservative Democrats in the House who threatened to get on planes rather than hold this vote,” AOC said. “We have to really just call a spade a spade. We cannot, in good faith, blame the Republican Party when House Democrats have the majority.”

In June, the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 to allow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to keep its eviction moratorium in place until July 31. But only Congress could authorize a further extension. Then, the White House waited until the day before the House adjourned, about a month later, to release a statement asking Congress to extend the moratorium.

Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA) tried to rush a bill to extend the moratorium through to the end of 2021. Waters is the chairwoman of the Financial Services Committee. AOC is her fellow committee member. However the bill did not pass.

 “We have all left town with plans to come back within 24 hours if necessary,” AOC said. “And I believe the expiration of the eviction moratorium and having 11 million Americans – one out of every six renters – at risk of being kicked out of their homes is worth coming back and triggering that 24-hour notice,” Ocasio-Cortez said. “We cannot leave town without doing our job.” In a tweet, she said “housing is a human right.”

You can follow Jenny Goldsberry on Twitter @jennyjournalism.

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Economy

Chevron downsizes global San Fran headquarters, paying for employees to move to Texas office

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Oil giant Chevron made a huge announcement saying it will be closing its current global headquarters in San Ramon, California. Even more telling, its encouraging employees to move to Houston, Texas.

The San Francisco Gate reported “the oil company will cover relocation costs for those voluntarily leaving for the Texas office, which has been growing and employs nearly 6,000 people. Meanwhile, the San Ramon office buildings have experienced dwindling numbers in recent years.”

Although the company is not leaving the state completely, “company leadership has pushed for a permanent move to Texas in the past” adds SFGATE. Chevron, which has had “deep roots” in California going back to the late 1800s, will vacate its 100-acre campus in 2023.

The Wall Street Journal reports the business hopes to move into a smaller space in San Ramon, which will remain its headquarters. A company spokesperson told SFGATE “the current real estate market provides the opportunity to right-size our office space to meet the requirements of our headquarters-based employee population.”

“The move is expected to occur during the third quarter of 2023” they continued. “Chevron will remain headquartered in California, where the company has a 140-year history and operations and partnerships throughout the state.”

The SFGATE notes Chevron is one of “the East Bay’s legacy companies joining the trend” to move their headquarters out of the area in recent years. Tech companies such as startups like Coinbase to industry pioneers like Hewlett Packard and Oracle have all vacated, with Elon Musk having been “one particularly outspoken voice decrying California’s business conditions.”

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