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Andrew Cuomo: Domestic Violence ‘Very Bad,’ But It’s ‘Not Death’

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When asked Wednesday about the economic and emotional tolls many New Yorkers are facing as a result of the coronavirus crisis, the State’s Governor Andrew Cuomo said that although the lockdown is difficult for residents, it’s their “responsibility” to comply in order to save lives.

Although he recognized that there are issues from the current social distancing measures such as a rise in domestic violence, emotional stress, and increased economic anxiety, Cuomo said it’s “very bad,” but “not death.”

“Economic hardship, yes, very bad, not death. Emotional stress from being locked in a house very bad, not death,” Cuomo said. “Domestic violence on the increase, very bad, not death, and not death of someone else. See, that’s what we have to factor into this equation. Yeah, it’s your life, do whatever you want, but you’re not responsible for my life.”

He added, “You have a responsibility to me. It’s not just about you. You have a responsibility to me, right. We started here saying it’s not about me, it’s about we. Get your head around the we concept, so it’s not all about you. It’s about me too. It’s about we.”

https://twitter.com/dbongino/status/1252695583816667137

There are many people, however, dying as a result of the unprecedented controls including the victims of economic hardships and rising domestic abuse. Calls to suicide and domestic violence hotlines, to name one example, have spiked in the last month.

The National Domestic Violence Hotline receives an average of 1800-2000 calls per day, however, with so many people staying at home there has been an increase and 3,829 of the victims calling over the last month have cited COVID-19 as leverage for their abuser, according to a statement provided to SaraACarter.com from the group’s CEO Katie Ray-Jones.

“Because we expect that people are spending more time at home, possibly not leaving the home for work each day, for example, we know survivors are spending more time in closer proximity to their abusers. This is stressful for everyone, but especially for survivors,” Ray-Jones said.

Earlier seeing the need for mental health care, Cuomo asked state mental health professionals to provide free care recognizing that “the mental health impact of this pandemic is very real.”

Now, his solution for at least those lacking an income is to seek work in “essential” fields.

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education

FL bans puberty blockers, transgender surgery for minors

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Breaking Friday, Florida’s Board of Medicine and state Board of Osteopathic Medicine voted to ban puberty blockers and sex-reassignment surgery for minors in the state.

“The chief point of agreement among all of the experts — and I must emphasize this — is that there is a pressing need for additional, high-quality clinical research,” said the board of medicine’s chair, Dr. David A. Diamond, a radiation oncologist.

More than 70 percent of children with gender dysphoria “typically outgrow” it, City Journal reported earlier this year.

National Review reports:

The board of medicine voted 6-3, with five others not present, on Friday to forbid doctors from prescribing puberty blockers and hormones or performing surgeries until a patient is 18. Exceptions will be made for children who are already receiving the treatment.

The Florida Board of Osteopathic Medicine also voted to ban the use of puberty blockers and sex-reassignment surgery in new patients who are minors but allowed an exception for children enrolled in clinical studies.

Florida is also one of at least nine states that prohibits Medicaid coverage of gender-transition services.

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