Connect with us

Nation

Andrew Cuomo Charged With ‘Sex Crime’ In New York

Cuomo was charged in Albany City Court Thursday

Published

on

Andrew Cuomo

On Thursday, disgraced former New York Governor Andrew Cuomo was charged with a “sex crime,” specifically the Class A misdemeanor of “forcible touching.”

The misdemeanor criminal complaint alleges that Cuomo “did intentionally, and for no legitimate purpose, forcibly place his hand under the blouse shirt of the victim…and onto her intimate body part…specifically, the victims [sic] left breast for the purposes of degrading and satisfying his sexual desire.”

“The incident allegedly took place on the afternoon of Dec. 7 on the second floor of the Executive Mansion, the governor’s official residence,” the New York Post noted. “The name of the alleged victim was redacted from the complaint but the allegations line up with those made by former Cuomo aide Brittany Commisso, 33.”

“The complaint charges Cuomo with forcible touching, which carries a maximum sentence of one year in jail,” the New York Post added. “The alleged evidence against him includes a text message from Cuomo’s cell phone, state police aviation records for Dec. 7 and news reports of a press conference that day, state police Blackberry PIN messages, swipe card records from the state Capitol, and Commisso’s testimony to the Attorney General’s Office.”

In August, Cuomo resigned after an independent investigation found he had “sexually harassed a number of current and former New York State employees.”

The scandal began in December when the first of 11 women accused Cuomo of sexual misconduct. The women, who were mostly employees of his, said Cuomo engaged in sexually aggressive behavior including non-consensual kissing, groping, inappropriate invitations to play strip poker and comments about their sex lives.

The independent investigation found that “the Governor sexually harassed a number of current and former New York State employees by, among other things, engaging in unwelcome and nonconsensual touching, as well as making numerous offensive comments of a suggestive and sexual nature that created a hostile work environment for women.”

You may like

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Nation

Remote Learning Lowered Test Scores in Every State; Minority Students Hit the Worst

Published

on

Remote Learning

A paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) shows remote learning has had a negative impact on students’ test scores in every state. Not only were students across the country affected, minority students were impacted the most.

According to the publication, remote learning led to declines in test scores for English and math, when compared to scores of students who went to schools with more in-person learning. “Our research shows that test score losses are significantly larger in districts with less in-person learning,” said Emily Oster, professor of economics at Brown University.

“This suggests, yes, that virtual learning was – and is – less effective than in-person learning, at least as measured by school-based testing” added Oster. “Passing rates in math declined by 14.2 percentage points on average; we estimate this decline was 10.1 percentage points smaller for districts fully in-person,” the study found.

The research combined “district-level schooling mode data from the 2020-21 school year,” “district-level test score data from 2015 to 2021” and “demographic data from the NCES,” according to the study.

Data was collected from students in third to eighth grades in 12 states: Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, Ohio, Rhode Island, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Score declines showed variations by state, as well. Virginia “which had the most complete virtual learning time, along with Colorado, saw an almost 32% drop on math test scores in the 2020-21 school year when compared to the 2018-19 school year” reports Tampa Free Press.

Wyoming, however, “which had the most in-person learning, along with Florida, saw just a 2.3% drop in English, the study found.”

“Changes in English Language Arts (ELA) were smaller than math scores overall, but drops in scores were greater in districts with larger black and Hispanic populations and students eligible for free and reduced lunch prices” reports Tampa Free Press.

“Districts that have a larger share of black and Hispanic students and less in-person schooling also saw a greater decline in ELA test scores than those with more in-person schooling. “

You may like

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending Now

Advertisement

Trending

Subscribe To Sara's Newsletter

Subscribe To Sara's Newsletter

Join Sara's mailing list to receive the latest stories as soon as they're available!

You have Successfully Subscribed!