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Amazon Facing Backlash Over ‘Blue Lives Murder’ Merchandise

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Amazon says it has a policy against the sale of “offensive and controversial materials” however, “Blue Lives Murder” merchandise, referring to cops as killers, is being sold on the global website and law enforcement officials say they are canceling their subscriptions.

The sale of the t-shirts saying “Blue Lives Murder” was brought to the attention of this reporter by law enforcement, who said they will be canceling their Prime membership with the company over the decision to allow the inflammatory merchandise to sell on its website.

In one communication between a customer and an Amazon employee, which was posted on Facebook, the Amazon employee was questioned about the hateful material.

The customer service response: “Let me check. We stand in solidarity with our Black employees, customers, and communities, and are committed to helping build a country and world where everyone can live with dignity and free from fear. As a part of that effort, Amazon will donate a total of $10 million to organizations that are working to bring about social justice and improve the lives of Black and African Americans. For more information, please visit the Amazon Day One blog.”

“Okay, so I’m going to take that as you don’t support our law enforcement,” said the customer. “Thanks for letting me know. I’ll be sure to spread the world.”

“You have rights to do whatever you think is best but we are entitled for with this information,” the Amazon customer service representative responded.

However, Amazon contends that it has a policy against hateful speech, posting on its website, “Amazon does not allow products that promote, incite or glorify hatred, violence, racial, sexual or religious intolerance or promote organizations with such views. We’ll also remove listings that graphically portray violence or victims of violence.”

But that doesn’t appear to be the case when it comes to law enforcement.

“It is disheartening to see Amazon throw its hat into the arena and choose sides over such a volatile topic,” said Chris Cabrera, Vice President of the National Border Patrol Council. “There are over 800,000 Law Enforcement professionals nationwide. It is preposterous that the entire profession would be judged by the actions of so few. Amazon is free to support whoever they choose, however, it is possible to support Black Lives Matter movement without alienating law enforcement as a whole.”

The Amazon anti-law enforcement t-shirts and merchandise became available after the tragic death of George Floyd, 46, two weeks ago after a Minneapolis police officer kept his knee on Floyd’s neck. Floyd, who was African-American, said ‘I can’t breath’ and later died in custody on May 25. His funeral and burial was on Tuesday, in Houston, Texas where he grew up.

Amazon did not immediately respond for comment.

Former New York Police Department Commissioner Bernard Kerik told “The Sara Carter Show” this week that the radical left has falsely suggested that police brutality is endemic. He noted that it is not and that law enforcement officials across the country that have sacrificed for their communities were shocked by Floyd’s death and many have given their lives while on the job.

He said companies like “Amazon, Apple, Google, you name it. You have those corporate leaders in America basically and the keyboard celebrities who get out there who are major influences to the young, they get out there and they put all this radical left-wing propaganda out there and they get these kids to follow it.”

“What they don’t realize is what the outcome is going to be because they don’t know history,” he added, referring to historical warnings, of what happened in Cuba and Venezuela when the communists took control.

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Minnesota farmer’s lawsuit prompts removal of race and sex-based grant program

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Five months after Minnesota farmer Lance Nistler filed a federal lawsuit with the help of the Pacific Legal Foundation (PLF), the state has removed race- and sex-based preferences from its Down Payment Assistance Grant Program. This significant policy change followed Nistler’s legal challenge, which highlighted the discriminatory nature of the program’s selection process.

Pacific Legal Foundation writes involvement in Nistler’s case drew attention and criticism from Minnesota progressives. Writing in the Minnesota Reformer, Sigrid Jewett accused PLF of using Nistler “as a pawn in a larger culture war game.” She questioned why a California-based legal firm with numerous Supreme Court victories would be interested in representing a small Minnesota farmer pro bono.

PLF opposes all race- and sex-based preferences in the law, and that’s the real reason the firm chose to represent Nistler. The foundation stands against discrimination in various domains, including government board selections, school admissions, government contracts, and grant distributions, such as in Nistler’s case.

Here are the facts: Minnesota’s Down Payment Assistance Grant Program offers up to $15,000 toward the purchase of farmland. Recipients are chosen through a lottery system. However, before the policy change, even if a recipient was among the first picked through the lottery—as Nistler was, being selected ninth—they could be bumped to the back of the line if they were not a racial minority, female, LGBTQIA+, or otherwise designated as an “emerging” farmer by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

Despite being chosen ninth in the lottery, which awarded grants to 68 applicants, Nistler did not receive a grant. He was moved from ninth to 102nd on the waitlist because he is a white male.

Nistler grew up on his family farm, milking cows. “They would lose money every year,” he says of the family operation. After he left for school, his family sold the cows and switched to farming soybeans, oats, and wheat. Lance’s father and uncle now run the farm, but they’re getting older. Lance, who has a degree in electronic engineering and worked in HVAC, is interested in buying a 40-acre chunk of the family farm, becoming the fourth-generation farmer in his family.

The land isn’t just going to be given to Lance. This is a working farm, and the Nistlers aren’t a wealthy family that can transfer land from one generation to the next without consideration. “My dad and uncle, they don’t have 401(k)s or anything,” Lance says. “I mean, the land and the equipment, that’s their retirement. This stuff isn’t given away. I’m not just going to get it handed down to me and inherited. It has to be purchased, and it is not cheap.”

Despite being from a farming family, Lance considers himself a new farmer—he has never owned farmland before, and he has an electronics background. Buying these 40 acres would be a huge step for Lance, planting him firmly in the farming world, which is what Minnesota’s grant program aimed to do. The idea that he would have qualified as an emerging farmer if only his skin were a different color struck Lance as wrong.

“The country we live in, the idea is it’s equal opportunity for everyone,” he says. “And if that’s what it is, then well, why shouldn’t I have the same chances?”

When Lance filed his lawsuit in January, the complaint argued that the discriminatory process violated the Constitution’s Equal Protection Clause. The complaint stated:

“Nistler brings this lawsuit to vindicate his constitutional right to equal protection of the law. He brings it to give all Minnesotans a fair chance at a difference-making grant program. He brings it in the hope that he will be able to own that small farm in the near future. He brings it because he is not giving up on his dream.”

In May, after Lance called attention to the unconstitutional policy, Minnesota Governor Tim Walz signed legislation removing the race and sex prioritization from the program. Now, Minnesota will treat farmers equally—as the Constitution promises.

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