Connect with us

COVID-19

Almost 100 Employees At Yale New Haven Health Fired For Being Unvaccinated

Published

on

Almost 100 employees in the Yale New Haven Health system were fired on Monday because they had not yet received a COVID-19 vaccine.

“The employees were on suspension and had until Monday to get vaccinated following a June 30 mandate announcement by Yale New Haven Health, and other hospital-based health systems in Connecticut,” the New York Post reported.

“We did pretty well, I think, all things considered,” Associate Chief Clinical Officer Dr. Ohm Deshpande told the New Haven Register. “We’re at 94 at this moment who are subject to termination. They’re getting notified today that they’re being separated from the organization.”

Employees who did not meet the vaccination deadline are still able to get their jobs back if they get vaccinated against COVID-19.

Ronnie Kelley, an employee at Yale New Haven Hospital who ended up getting the vaccine after the mandate, told FOX 61 that employees did not feel the need to get vaccinated if they felt that COVID-19 was not life-threatening.

“I had my doubts about it, but I’ve seen how people are getting sick around me and I’m working in the ER where most of the sick people are coming in. I feel there was a need to get it,” Kelley said. “I can only speak for myself. I can’t speak for everybody else, because everybody feels different about getting the shot. If they feel as though it’s not life-threatening, they don’t feel the need to get it.”

Yale New Haven Health’s decision to fire nearly 100 healthcare workers comes during a nationwide nursing shortage – an issue that is especially problematic because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

COVID-19

Internal docs show Amazon censored books on vaccinations due to pressure from Biden White House

Published

on

Vaccine

Recently released internal Amazon emails reveal the company caved to pressure from the Biden White House to suppress available vaccine information.

Provided to the House Judiciary Committee, the emails light on the extent of the Biden White House’s influence over the retail giant regarding vaccine-related content. The emails disclose a concerning narrative of pressure from government officials to suppress information deemed unfavorable to their agenda.

Republican Representative Jim Jordan of Ohio took to Twitter to disclose the findings, stating that the emails reveal direct pressure from the White House on Amazon to censor books expressing views contrary to those endorsed by the administration. One email, albeit redacted, explicitly poses the question of whether the administration requested the removal of certain books, to which the answer was affirmative.

National Review highlights the successful efforts of the Biden administration in persuading Amazon to limit the visibility of titles skeptical of vaccine efficacy. White House senior adviser for Covid-19 response, Andrew Slavitt, expressed concerns about Amazon’s role in propagating what he termed as “misinformation” regarding vaccines. His emails illustrate a push for action to address what he perceived as a proliferation of dissenting views.

In response to Slavitt’s inquiries, Amazon initially hesitated to take overt action, fearing backlash from conservative media outlets. The company’s internal deliberations reflect a concern for public perception and the potential amplification of the issue if intervention were too conspicuous.

Despite initially refraining from manual intervention, Amazon eventually succumbed to pressure, engaging in discussions with White House officials. The company’s internal documents reveal deliberations on whether the administration sought outright book bans or alterations to search results. Amazon’s stance, as expressed in their meeting with the White House, emphasized the provision of diverse viewpoints and the distinction between online retail and social media platforms.

 

 

Continue Reading

Trending