Department of Justice Attorney General William Barr revealed Sunday afternoon that “the Special Counsel did not find that the Trump campaign, or anyone associated with it, conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in these efforts, despite multiple offers from the Russian-affiliated individuals to assist the Trump campaign.”

Barr also stated in his letter that he will make public as much of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report due to the significant public interest in the matter. He said the release will be “consistent with applicable law, regulations and Department policy.”



Barr’s summary was delivered to Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-SC, Ranking Member of the Senate Judiciary Committee Dianne Feinstein, D-CA, Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee Jerrold Nadler, D-NY and Ranking Member Susan Collins, D-Maine.

Mueller Determined: Russia Interfered In 2016 Election

Mueller’s investigation determined that there were “two main Russian efforts to influence the 2016 election,” said Barr in his summary.

Barr’s summary stated that the first “involved attempts by a Russian organization, the Internet Research Agency” to disseminate disinformation and conducted social media operations in the United States to “sow social discord.”

The second revelation involved the Russian government. Barr summarized Mueller’s discovery by stating that the government conducted computer hacking operations designed to “gather and disseminate information to influence the election.”



He noted that Mueller’s investigators discovered that the government successfully hacked into “persons affiliated with the Clinton campaign and Democratic Party organizations, and publicly disseminated those materials through various intermediaries, including WikiLeaks.”

“Based on these activities, the Special Counsel brought criminal charges against a number of Russian military officers for conspiring to hack into computers in the Unites States for purposes of influencing the election,” stated Barr.

Mueller Vague on Obstruction of Justice

Mueller’s investigation also looked at whether or not Trump obstructed justice during the investigation.

“After making a ‘thorough factual investigation’ into these matters, the Special Counsel considered whether to evaluate the conduct under Department standards governing prosecution and declination decisions but ultimately determined not to make a traditional prosecutorial judgement.”



This is where the Mueller investigation is obscure.

According to Barr, “the Special Counsel therefore, did not draw a conclusion – one way or the other – as to whether the examined conduct constituted obstruction.”

The report displays evidence on both sides of the argument, said Barr. It leaves the question “unresolved” based on what the Special Counsel states is “difficult issues” based on both law and fact.

“The Special Counsel states that ‘while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him.”



AG March 24 2019 Letter to House and Senate Judiciary Committees

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