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21 states sue Biden for revoking Keystone pipeline permit

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A group of Republican states are filing a lawsuit Thursday to overturn President Joe Biden’s cancellation of the Keystone XL oil pipeline.

21 states, led by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton and Montana Attorney General Austin Knudsen, submitted a complaint Wednesday to a Texas federal court arguing that the President does not have the authority to cancel the permit.

Revoking the permit is a “regulation of interstate and international commerce” that should be left to Congress, the complaint said.

Some of the states included in the lawsuit have Democratic governors, including Kentucky and Kansas, however, all of the states have republican attorneys general.

The proposed 1,200-mile pipeline would have carried oil from Canada to the U.S.

“This pipeline was set to go through six counties in extreme Eastern Montana… five of those counties are already designated as high-poverty counties,” Montana AG Knudsen told Fox News. “The project was set to become the largest property taxpayer in all of those counties… That’s out the window. Just shy of 4,000 jobs, that’s out the window.”

Biden revoked the permit for the Keystone pipeline via executive order on his first day in office, saying that the pipeline would cause a “dangerous, potentially catastrophic, climate trajectory.”

“The United States must be in a position to exercise vigorous climate leadership in order to achieve a significant increase in global climate action and put the world on a sustainable climate pathway. Leaving the Keystone XL pipeline permit in place would not be consistent with my Administration’s economic and climate imperatives,” Biden said.

Kundsen called Biden’s cancellation of the permit “an empty virtue signal to his wealthy coastal elite donors.”

“The power to regulate foreign and interstate commerce belongs to Congress – not the President. This is another example of Joe Biden overstepping his constitutional role to the detriment of Montanans,” he added.

Opponents of the pipeline argue that the U.S. should not be importing carbon-intensive tar sands oil. Native American tribes have also shown opposition for the pipeline, saying the Trump administration ignored their treaty rights when approving the pipeline.

However, pipeline supporters argue that the project would bring in revenue for the states and thousands of jobs.

Follow Annaliese Levy on Twitter @AnnalieseLevy

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Economy

No help at our border, but Biden announces $5 billion going to bike paths, wider sidewalks

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In the world of Democrat delusion, they think $5 billion is necessary, at this point in time, to make bike paths and widen side walks. You cannot make this up. They have approved $40 billion in aide to Ukraine in a heartbeat under President Biden, while having rejected former President Trump’s request for a mere $5 billion to secure our border.

The news also comes as fentanyl and the drug overdoses are the number one cause of death in the U.S. There’s also an increase in human smuggling and extortion to pay to cross the border. But no; let’s make some bike paths and widen sidewalks. That is an immediate emergency.

Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg announced Monday that money will be used over five years under his department’s new “Safe Streets & Roads for All” program. The $5 billion ini federals funds will be used “to slow down cars chia more speed cameras, carve out bike paths and wider sidewalks and urging commuters to public transit” reports Daily Mail.

“The aim will be to provide a direct infusion of federal cash to communities that pledge to promote safety for the multiple users of a roadway, particularly pedestrians and bicyclists.” The announcement also coincides with the six-month anniversary of President Biden’s infrastructure legislation, and the beginning of the 2022 “infrastructure week.”

The desire to fix roads is a noble one, as “road traffic injuries also are the leading cause of death among young people aged 5-29. Young adults aged 15-4 account for more than half of all road deaths” reports Daily Mail, which adds:

Still, much of the federal roadmap relies on cooperation from cities and states, and it could take months if not years to fully implement with discernible results – too late to soothe 2022 midterm voters unsettled by this and other pandemic-related ills, such as rising crime.

The latest U.S. guidance Monday invites cities and localities to sketch out safety plans in their applications for the federal grants, which are to be awarded late this year.

It cites examples of good projects as those that promise to transform a high-crash roadway, such as by adding rumble strips to slow cars or installing speed cameras, which the department says could provide more equitable enforcement than police traffic stops; flashing beacons for pedestrian crosswalks; new ‘safe routes’ via sidewalks or other protected pathways to school or public transit in underserved communities; and other ‘quick build’ roadway changes designed with community input.

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